bell hooks resources

themindislimitless:

Some of the work bell hooks’ has done as available on the internet for personal education and reference. Certain books that were up are gone and I’m looking about finding them again. In the meantime if you need them, contact me by leaving a message with your email address in the submissions box and I’ll email them to you. If you find anything, please contact me as well. The most updated version of this list will always be here.

To note, this is meant in particular for those people who’d like to educate themselves but don’t have the resources to get these books for themselves. bell hooks has put a lot of work into these, and it would be horrible if you could afford to buy the books and didn’t.

More online resources here.

Edit as of 23rd June, 2014: list updated (and alphabetized). Many thanks to wretchedoftheearth, elainecastillo, grim-dark, erosum, mmmajestic, andreaisace, ebookcollective, cantbereallif, ericstoller, sittinghereinbluejayway, nebulaemporium and other people through emails who all helped add links and resources.

bookphile:

The one thing I love about re-reading my favorite books is the ‘no need to rush’ feeling. You already know everything that happens to your darling babies, the plot, and your otp, so you can savor every detail like sip of the perfectly brewed tea on chilly sunday morning.

haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”
The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution by CLR James *
The Making Haiti: Saint Domingue Revolution From Below by Carolyn E. Fick 
Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution by Laurent Dubois 
A Concise History of the Haitian Revolution by Jeremy D. Popkin
Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History with Documents by Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrigus
Universal Emancipation: The Haitian Revolution and the Radical Enlightenment by Nick Nesbitt 
Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History by Susan Buck-Morss
The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution by Malick W. Ghachem
You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery by Jeremy D. Popkin
The World of the Haitian Revolution by David Patrick Geggus and Norman Fiering
* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.
Zoom Info
haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”
The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution by CLR James *
The Making Haiti: Saint Domingue Revolution From Below by Carolyn E. Fick 
Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution by Laurent Dubois 
A Concise History of the Haitian Revolution by Jeremy D. Popkin
Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History with Documents by Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrigus
Universal Emancipation: The Haitian Revolution and the Radical Enlightenment by Nick Nesbitt 
Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History by Susan Buck-Morss
The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution by Malick W. Ghachem
You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery by Jeremy D. Popkin
The World of the Haitian Revolution by David Patrick Geggus and Norman Fiering
* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.
Zoom Info
haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”
The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution by CLR James *
The Making Haiti: Saint Domingue Revolution From Below by Carolyn E. Fick 
Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution by Laurent Dubois 
A Concise History of the Haitian Revolution by Jeremy D. Popkin
Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History with Documents by Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrigus
Universal Emancipation: The Haitian Revolution and the Radical Enlightenment by Nick Nesbitt 
Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History by Susan Buck-Morss
The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution by Malick W. Ghachem
You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery by Jeremy D. Popkin
The World of the Haitian Revolution by David Patrick Geggus and Norman Fiering
* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.
Zoom Info
haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”
The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution by CLR James *
The Making Haiti: Saint Domingue Revolution From Below by Carolyn E. Fick 
Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution by Laurent Dubois 
A Concise History of the Haitian Revolution by Jeremy D. Popkin
Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History with Documents by Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrigus
Universal Emancipation: The Haitian Revolution and the Radical Enlightenment by Nick Nesbitt 
Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History by Susan Buck-Morss
The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution by Malick W. Ghachem
You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery by Jeremy D. Popkin
The World of the Haitian Revolution by David Patrick Geggus and Norman Fiering
* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.
Zoom Info
haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”
The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution by CLR James *
The Making Haiti: Saint Domingue Revolution From Below by Carolyn E. Fick 
Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution by Laurent Dubois 
A Concise History of the Haitian Revolution by Jeremy D. Popkin
Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History with Documents by Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrigus
Universal Emancipation: The Haitian Revolution and the Radical Enlightenment by Nick Nesbitt 
Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History by Susan Buck-Morss
The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution by Malick W. Ghachem
You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery by Jeremy D. Popkin
The World of the Haitian Revolution by David Patrick Geggus and Norman Fiering
* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.
Zoom Info
haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”
The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution by CLR James *
The Making Haiti: Saint Domingue Revolution From Below by Carolyn E. Fick 
Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution by Laurent Dubois 
A Concise History of the Haitian Revolution by Jeremy D. Popkin
Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History with Documents by Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrigus
Universal Emancipation: The Haitian Revolution and the Radical Enlightenment by Nick Nesbitt 
Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History by Susan Buck-Morss
The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution by Malick W. Ghachem
You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery by Jeremy D. Popkin
The World of the Haitian Revolution by David Patrick Geggus and Norman Fiering
* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.
Zoom Info
haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”
The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution by CLR James *
The Making Haiti: Saint Domingue Revolution From Below by Carolyn E. Fick 
Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution by Laurent Dubois 
A Concise History of the Haitian Revolution by Jeremy D. Popkin
Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History with Documents by Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrigus
Universal Emancipation: The Haitian Revolution and the Radical Enlightenment by Nick Nesbitt 
Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History by Susan Buck-Morss
The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution by Malick W. Ghachem
You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery by Jeremy D. Popkin
The World of the Haitian Revolution by David Patrick Geggus and Norman Fiering
* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.
Zoom Info
haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”
The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution by CLR James *
The Making Haiti: Saint Domingue Revolution From Below by Carolyn E. Fick 
Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution by Laurent Dubois 
A Concise History of the Haitian Revolution by Jeremy D. Popkin
Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History with Documents by Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrigus
Universal Emancipation: The Haitian Revolution and the Radical Enlightenment by Nick Nesbitt 
Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History by Susan Buck-Morss
The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution by Malick W. Ghachem
You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery by Jeremy D. Popkin
The World of the Haitian Revolution by David Patrick Geggus and Norman Fiering
* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.
Zoom Info
haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”
The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution by CLR James *
The Making Haiti: Saint Domingue Revolution From Below by Carolyn E. Fick 
Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution by Laurent Dubois 
A Concise History of the Haitian Revolution by Jeremy D. Popkin
Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History with Documents by Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrigus
Universal Emancipation: The Haitian Revolution and the Radical Enlightenment by Nick Nesbitt 
Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History by Susan Buck-Morss
The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution by Malick W. Ghachem
You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery by Jeremy D. Popkin
The World of the Haitian Revolution by David Patrick Geggus and Norman Fiering
* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.
Zoom Info
haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”
The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution by CLR James *
The Making Haiti: Saint Domingue Revolution From Below by Carolyn E. Fick 
Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution by Laurent Dubois 
A Concise History of the Haitian Revolution by Jeremy D. Popkin
Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History with Documents by Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrigus
Universal Emancipation: The Haitian Revolution and the Radical Enlightenment by Nick Nesbitt 
Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History by Susan Buck-Morss
The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution by Malick W. Ghachem
You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery by Jeremy D. Popkin
The World of the Haitian Revolution by David Patrick Geggus and Norman Fiering
* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.
Zoom Info

haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”

* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.

Discussion #8: Intersectionality and Disability | Disability in Kidlit

disabilityinkidlit:

For our first anniversary, we’re bringing back the discussion post format! In these posts, we ask our contributors for their thoughts on various topics. We’ll post one every Friday this month. Today, we asked:

Why is it that diversity in young adult, middle grade, and children’s literature is often represented as an either/or, without intersectionality? Characters can either be autistic or gay, for example, or a wheelchair user or Black, but rarely both. Why do you think we see so few characters who are marginalized in more than one way?

Snippets of their responses:

Marieke Nijkamp: And if you feel characters have to have a reason to be multi-dimensional, multi-diverse? I’d love to see an equally legitimate reason for characters to be white AND straight AND able-bodied AND middle class AND AND AND.

S. Jae-Jones: In my opinion, it all comes back to this mainstream idea of a “default”. The “default” is relatable. Stray too far from it, and it won’t sell.

Corinne Duyvis: It’s such a multi-faceted problem: first there’s the fact that most people don’t even see the need for these characters–as though people like me aren’t just as real and valid as the cishet-white-abled people who are often written about, and as though we don’t need representation just as much or more. 

s.e. smith: The fact is that many people have intersectional identities. Minority teens rarely get to see themselves in text at all, and those who experience multiple oppressions find it even harder to locate books that tell their stories.

Natalie Monroe: I personally think it’s because writers believe once a diverse element is added (ex: queer, ethnicity…), it’s done. Their book is now ‘diverse’ and ‘realistic’. But real life isn’t just one ball in a column, it’s a whole jumble of multicolored spheres across rows of columns.

[read the full answers—and several other people’s responses—here!]

Please add our own advice in a reblog or in the comments!

bluestockingbookworm:

At the bookstore today I did the thing. You know the thing. The thing where you hold the book and love the book and sob violently as you put the book back because you can’t afford the book.

Yeah. I did that thing.

bookphile:

A thank you present from macteenbooks, for participating in the Spring 2014 Fierce Reads Street Team!! I was part of the Monument 14 Street Team. Thank you so much MacTeen and to all the wonderful authors. All of these books are signed too! I’ve already read and have copies of a couple of these books , so I’m probably going to give a few of these away. So, stay tuned!!
Zoom Info
bookphile:

A thank you present from macteenbooks, for participating in the Spring 2014 Fierce Reads Street Team!! I was part of the Monument 14 Street Team. Thank you so much MacTeen and to all the wonderful authors. All of these books are signed too! I’ve already read and have copies of a couple of these books , so I’m probably going to give a few of these away. So, stay tuned!!
Zoom Info
bookphile:

A thank you present from macteenbooks, for participating in the Spring 2014 Fierce Reads Street Team!! I was part of the Monument 14 Street Team. Thank you so much MacTeen and to all the wonderful authors. All of these books are signed too! I’ve already read and have copies of a couple of these books , so I’m probably going to give a few of these away. So, stay tuned!!
Zoom Info
bookphile:

A thank you present from macteenbooks, for participating in the Spring 2014 Fierce Reads Street Team!! I was part of the Monument 14 Street Team. Thank you so much MacTeen and to all the wonderful authors. All of these books are signed too! I’ve already read and have copies of a couple of these books , so I’m probably going to give a few of these away. So, stay tuned!!
Zoom Info

bookphile:

A thank you present from macteenbooks, for participating in the Spring 2014 Fierce Reads Street Team!! I was part of the Monument 14 Street Team. Thank you so much MacTeen and to all the wonderful authors. All of these books are signed too! I’ve already read and have copies of a couple of these books , so I’m probably going to give a few of these away. So, stay tuned!!

Book Review

whoajas:

Hello! Okay, so I’ve been reading and collecting books since 2011. And just around this year, I fond to write reviews about books that I really liked (or loathed.) I sometimes rant rather than to write an actual review. Some consists of 3-5 sentences, others has 3 paragraphs. It really just depends on my mood, you know? When I feel like writing, I grab my phone, open the Notes app and just type down what I feel about that book. I don’t really get formal when it comes to book reviews. Idk, maybe sometimes I do, sometimes I don’t.

There will be times that I will first let you know what the book is about, then enumerate the main characters and let you know their role, what the books has thought me and then probably just say anything just to make that review long. Or just type whatever that I liked or disliked and be done with it already. Yep, not really the type of review that has patterns all the time.

Oh and yeah, I usually write the first draft of my book reviews on the train going to school. It clears my mind off of  things for a while and keeps me accompanied to make my ride to hellhole not boring. And I also have a Goodreads account! :)